?

CERAMIC BELLS. A mixture of Arizona clay, from a clay deposit in Globe, commercial stoneware and water combine to form a casting material known as slip. Bernadette O’Neill stirs this mixture in a large slip tank.
[Photo: Yuki Yanagimoto & Text: sa]

?

CERAMIC BELLS. A mixture of Arizona clay, from a clay deposit in Globe, commercial stoneware and water combine to form a casting material known as slip. Bernadette O’Neill stirs this mixture in a large slip tank.
[Photo: Yuki Yanagimoto & Text: sa]



?

Slip is poured into plaster molds by Jennifer Wolf. Excess slip is drawn out as the bell continues to dry until it is ready to be lifted out of the mold.
[Photo: Yuki Yanagimoto & Text: sa]



?

The same fine silt that is used in so many construction projects at Arcosanti, also provides an ideal material for bell molds. Each earth cast bell takes with it a little of the mold which adds unique color and texture.
[Photo: Yuki Yanagimoto & Text: sa]



?

Every finished bell receives a unique design hand carved while it is still partially damp. Bernadette O’Neill and Nadia Begin.
[Photo: Yuki Yanagimoto & Text: sa]



?

Bells are kiln fired to cone three [2134 degree F]. Ceramics manager Ed Werman and Bernadette.
[Photo: Yuki Yanagimoto & Text: sa]



?

The bells are carefully balanced and assembled. Nadia Begin.
[Photo: Yuki Yanagimoto & Text: sa]



?

A beautiful and unique selection of COSANTI ORIGINAL bells are available at the Arcosanti Gallery, at Cosanti and on-line through our web-site.
[Photo: Yuki Yanagimoto & Text: sa]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>