? Master Artist Yo Takimoto visited Arcosanti to teach his Japanese Wood Carving class for the second time.
Master Takimoto offers classes in Japan and on the west-coast of the United States. He brings pieces of American wood for his classes in Japan and when he teaches in the United States, students have a choice to carve with Japanese wood. ? Master Artist Yo Takimoto visited Arcosanti to teach his Japanese Wood Carving class for the second time.
Master Takimoto offers classes in Japan and on the west-coast of the United States. He brings pieces of American wood for his classes in Japan and when he teaches in the United States, students have a choice to carve with Japanese wood.
[from upper left] Everyone picked out a piece of wood for their carving. Master Takimoto chooses the right kind of knife for each student, depending on the hard- or softness of their choice of wood.
Students view some of the masters carvings.
Director Tomiaki Tamura formally introduces Master Tokimoto.


? Students use japanese hand carving knifes called “Kiridashi”. The carving process is best described in Yo Takimoto’s brochure:
“When carving wood, I am often reminded of the mother nature that tends to be forgotten in the urban environment. I can be in tune with nature while spending hours and hours in the end with the wood, and paying attention to what the wood itself is doing. I call this “kikezuri” which is an act of whittling rather than just carving.
Many woods that I bring to the workshops are from Japan, and from US where I have traveled and collected along the way. Each has different history, touch, scent, and character. At my woodcarving class, I encourage everyone to pick the material as you see it, and to find the character of the wood as you carve it.”
To add to this, Master Takimoto encouraged his students to carve instinctively, not to think too much about it, to just let the carving emerge.


? At the end of the class, all participants sat in a circle and passed around their carvings. Each person talked about the experience with their piece of wood and what the end result represented to them.
We thank Master Yo Takimoto for his gracious tutelage and a fine experience.

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